Friday, June 22, 2012

Kasie West Takes The Truth


As I was reading through some of the truth and dares you guys have submitted I came across one submitted by Alyssa Sooklal. She asked: "When was a time you lost your dignity?" And I couldn't resist. I had to share a post I wrote about three years ago for my own blog about this very topic. How as a mother of four I wasn't sure if I had any dignity left. So forgive me for recycling a post, but maybe you mother's out there will relate. 

Who Needs Dignity?

I sat down to check my e mail and smeared across the back of my hand was a dried booger. Yes, dried, as in, it had been there for a while. It would have been disgusting enough had it been my own, but it wasn’t. It was my two-year-old son’s. It would have been understandable had I not remembered exactly how it had gotten there, which would have been the case on any other day (there had been other days).

As I looked at this particular booger, however, I knew how it had come to be there. It had been bath time, it had been hanging out of his nose, and I had wiped it, (with my finger, of course, what else would I wipe it with?) and as I had gone to throw it away, it had disappeared. I thought to myself at the time, ‘huh, I wonder where that booger went?’ And then just as quickly I had thought, ‘oh well.’
So, fast-forward to the now dried up booger. What would I do? Would I get a tissue for it, like I should have done when I originally saw it hanging out of his nose? Or would I let it sit for another few minutes while I checked my e mail? It wasn’t getting any drier or less disgusting, of course I waited. Which brought me to the question I asked myself a lot as a mother of four children under the age of ten—did I have any dignity left? And the answer I always came back with was—of course not.

I thought back, trying to remember at exactly what point, over the last ten years, I had lost it. I concluded that it wasn’t something that had happened all at once. It was a culmination of many experiences. After all, I had at one point been a very self-respecting individual. Or so I had successfully fooled myself into thinking for many years.

It wasn’t something I lost merely by becoming a mother. In fact, I can remember clearly my first child as a baby. When her binky would fall on the ground, I would wash it under hot water for several minutes. I would carefully check her diaper for any signs of a “stinky” by lifting it away from her leg and peeking inside. I even remember gagging when I was changing her diaper one time and poop came squirting out, landing on my arm. I must’ve used just short of a million wipes to scrub my arm clean.

Then my second child came. I was slightly more relaxed in my dignity. If her binky fell on the floor, thirty seconds under luke warm water seemed sufficient for disinfection. Checking the diaper became a job for my nose instead of my eyes.

The public humiliation seemed to come more frequently with the new addition to the family. My first child, perhaps in an attempt for attention, thought it was her duty to take off her diaper and streak through the aisles at large, crowded, stores. When I had my bits of dignity left, it was very hard for me to hunt down an employee and say, “Um, there’s been a spill in aisle four.” “What kind of spill,” they would inevitably ask.“Urine,” I would mumble before leaving as quickly as possible.

Then my third child came and I came to the realization that certain behaviors of practice previously attempted now seemed unrealistic. If the binky fell on the floor, my own mouth provided just the right amount of disinfection. After all, I rarely had access to a faucet of running water. Was she poopy? A finger directly into the side of the diaper could find out quickly. Did that make you gag? Not me. In fact, I rarely gagged at all these days. Not even when my fourth child spit up directly on to my face, causing momentary blindness.

Public humiliation seemed to happen less these days as well. Oh wait…no…it happened more, I had just become less humiliated. Did it bother me when I walked through the isles at a grocery store with no children, but a large chocolate drool stain down the front of my shirt? No, because if I had put on a new shirt before I left, it would have been dirty by the end of the day too, and that would have just equaled more laundry.

Have I made proper reference to all bodily functions yet? Just making sure, a person lacking dignity would include every last one.

I finally went to the sink and rinsed off the booger. After drying my hands on a towel, I rubbed my finger across my now clean hand. It felt soft, as if I had applied an expensive mask to my skin, the kind they sold for a lot of money in the department stores. Who needed expensive masks when they had kids? And who needed dignity? Not me. I had so much more.

Thanks for the truth, Alyssa! Maybe you know me a little better than you wanted to now. :) But I want some loss of dignity stories in the comments section. I don't want to be humiliated by my booger-hand all by myself. 

20 comments:

  1. Kasie, you are a brutally honest woman. And what is more dignified that that?

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    1. Have I scared you, April? I promise there are many glamorous moments in motherhood as well. I'll let you know what they are in about 10 years. lol

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  2. Hahaha, love this story. It's so disgustingly, horrifyingly true. You're a brave woman! ;-)

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    1. Having kids requires bravery. But it's forced bravery. lol

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  3. Dignity. Who needs it? I returned from the bathroom to the table at a fairly decent and crowded restaurant only for my daughter to yell, "Did you do number one or two?"

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  4. Thanks Kasie! Your honesty humbles me. I'm not sure I could ever be that great of a mom (if I ever decide that motherhood is for me).
    By the way, I saw Pivot Point's cover! How pretty! :)

    Alyssa Sooklal <3

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    1. Thanks for the truth Alyssa! It was fun. And I don't know if this story qualifies me as a 'great' mom. But I do love those little stinkers. :)

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  5. Ah Kasie! The indignity of Motherhood! Good times, good times! Personally I think the worst indignity of all is the fact that I have to be careful and tightly cross my legs when I feel a sneeze coming on, in order not to pee myself. Ah yes, dignity, where've you gone?

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  6. I'm so glad to know I'm not the only one! My fav is the thumb-lick to clean a child's face, which was something I swore I'd never do...and totally do all the time.

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  7. I just realized that at least half the authors that contribute to this blog have no children. Mua ha ha ha ha! Are you all scared now??

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  8. As someone who is about to become a first-time mum, I probably shouldn't have read that. *hides*

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    1. That was just the humiliation highlight reel. lol There are many many amazingly fun and heartwarming moments as well. You'll love it.

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  9. Boogers. Fun times. Hah, thanks Kasie!!

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